Pistachio Kid – Sweet Remedies: The SMM Review

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Here at SMM, we like the unique, the lone ranger, the poor bastards clawing and crawling to make their mark in the world.

You may not guess it at first glance, but this doesn’t just include the bizarre, horrific and weird. It includes all of those less heard and known.

Before this review, I had never heard of Pistachio Kid. Not surprising considering this is the Pistachio Kid debut album.

Singer, songwriter, and instrumentalist Charlie McKeon takes you on a calming journey in this debut album. The songs play as though he were sitting in the room with you, telling you the story of his life, stolen bikes, fields to play in, and the good times he spent in his home town of Liverpool or attending Leeds College of Music.

The music is clear and crisp, something I’d listen to while writing or working. It isn’t distracting and I could simply tap my foot to the beat while chilling, a lemonade in hand on a warm summer, or a warm drink in a mountain lodge between snowboarding runs, or a tavern in a fantasy world.

I imagine Mckeon as a bard, singing songs of his adventures to tavern patrons. Traveling from town to town in search of fame and fortune with only his guitar and laptop computer strapped to his back.

My personal favorite of the album is Vistabella Road. The acapella intro leading into guitar and piano is like warm butter to the ears. Honestly, I have no idea what the lyrics mean. And Christopher Columbus was a bit of a monster… so… there’s that… But the song is great.

The album is also surprisingly dark. One song sings about a lover and her family and friends hanging from a tree. It’s reminiscent of Doki Doki Literature Club. If you haven’t played that game, you should. Cute and cuddly at first glance, with morbidity and death buried beneath the surface waiting to spring and give you anxiety and nightmares.

Despite my enjoyment of the songs, there are a few songs that left me wanting more. They simply felt too short, not in length, but in story, the endings felt clipped and a bit rushed. The song would feel like it was picking up for something big, or a continuation, then.

There were also a few songs that I felt needed a bit more editing. I’m not sure if it was intentional, missed, or what, but the breath and click at the end of some of the songs, or the sound of what could have been a computer mouse was a bit distracting for me. It’s something I’d expect from the early stages of music recording, not today with fancy editing software. Again, maybe it’s for affect.

Overall, if you’re into chill, folky music, you should check out this album. It’s a good first installment for a great artist.

 

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