Tag: matthew bartlett

5 Weird Writers’ Recommended Reading: Fiction Collections

Gwendolyn Kiste:  Something Borrowed, Something Blood-Soaked by Christa Carmen There are so many wonderful horror and weird fiction collections out there, but one that has stuck with me is Christa Carmen’s debut collection. The breadth of stories is breathtaking, from tales that aren’t afraid to get visceral and gutting to quieter horror that’s profoundly heart-wrenching.

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Kindle Crack: Killer Deals on Ebooks by Nick Mamatas, Brian Evenson, David Foster Wallace, and More!

Kindle Crack is back with more Nick Mamatas! Night Shade Books’ I Am Providence just peaked bestseller status in horror comedy on Amazon, so there’s no doubt that you need to be there hitting “Buy now with 1-Click” STAT. This is simply pure deliciousness. No Kindle Crack feels complete without a Brian Evenson sale. I’ve said it

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Mannequin: Tales of Wood Made Flesh

We’ve been announcing it sporadically on social media, and it’s about time we brought it up here. Silent Motorist Media is officially set to publish a debut anthology at the end of February, 2019. If you’ve happened to notice our open call for submissions for a second anthology, Orgy of the Dumb, you might be tempted to

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Welcome to Leeds! (And Please Ignore the Quiet Weeping in the Woods): An Interview with Matthew Bartlett

When I asked Matthew Bartlett if he’d like to do an interview with Silent Motorist Media, I hadn’t read his work. Other writers I admire kept mentioning him, so I knew he’d be a good fit. I wasn’t prepared, however, for the binge read Gateways to Abomination would inspire. Bartlett’s work is unsettling, unique and

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The Weird on Television: 6 Weird Books That Should Be TV Shows

Weird fiction isn’t something that occurs exclusively on the fringes of the literary world. Consider Neil Gaiman’s Hugo and Nebula award-winning novel American Gods, which, as we all know, was adapted into a television series on the Stars network. There’s no denying the literary weirdness of American Gods, even if Gaiman isn’t quite as strange

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